Attention Everyone- Rattlesnakes Are Out

Please be aware of Rattlesnakes!

  • Watch where you step, look down!
  • Listen to yor surroundings.  The rattle is a warning.
  • Snake heads can bite up to an hour after they are dead.
  • Watch your pets, they will find the snakes for you.

How to Treat Rattlesnake bites:

The first and most important thing to do is get away from the snake, as they can strike again if they feel threatened. Don’t waste time trying to catch the snake, but try to remember its size and color. This may help your medical team identify which species it was that bit you and locate the correct antivenin.

Seek medical assistance as soon as possible. Call for an ambulance if you’re able to.  You should reach medical help within 30 minutes of being bitten. If the bite is left untreated, your bodily functions will break down over a period of two or three days and the bite may result in severe organ damage or death.

There are some common misconceptions about the treatment of rattlesnake bites. While waiting for the ambulance, here’s how to minimize your risk:

  • Don’t raise the area above the level of the heart. If you do this, your blood containing rattlesnake venom will reach your heart more quickly.
  • Stay as still as possible, as movement will increase your blood flow and the venom will circulate faster.
  • Remove any tight clothing or jewelry before you start to swell.
  • Let the wound bleed, as this may allow some of the venom to be released.
  • Don’t wash the wound, as your medical team may be able to use some of the venom from your skin to more quickly identify the correct antivenin.
  • Place a clean bandage on the wound.
  • Try to remain calm, as anxiety and panic can increase your heart rate, which will cause the venom to spread.
  • If you begin to experience signs of shock, try to lie down on your back, raise your feet slightly, and keep warm.
  • Don’t cut the wound, as this doesn’t help and you could cause an infection.
  • Don’t try to suck the venom from the wound, as you then introduce the venom to your mouth as well as introduce the bacteria from your mouth to the wound.
  • Don’t use a tourniquet or apply ice or water.

It’s imperative that you get to the hospital as soon as possible. Don’t waste time on procedures that have been shown to be ineffective.

Here are a few links of useful information-

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/snakes/symptoms.html?fbclid=IwAR1Uztj6ADHmnqxIrllaVyPCHCqu-htBmKA8MI2ySZ7IUEwKnb807vI26Bo

https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Keep-Me-Wild/Rattlesnakes

By Chris Cowan Education 0 Comments

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