By Chris Cowan

Be Prepared

This weekend the weather will be cooling off after a HOT week. Make sure that when you pack you bring plenty of clothing layers, tarps, sunscreen, shovels, enough food and then some extra in case of delays, always tell someone where you are going and when you plan to return and be SAFE!

Since the temperatures will change this weekend always be aware of fire restrictions.  Start by getting a campfire permit from any CAL FIRE, U.S. Forest Service, or BLM station or office. Your campfire permit is valid from the date issued until the end of the calendar year. Permits are required to have campfire or portable gas stoves on public lands. Check to ensure there aren’t any local fire restrictions in the area. During periods of high fire danger, campfires may be restricted. Also, keep a shovel and bucket of water nearby at all times.

  • Choose a safe location
  • Clear a minimum 10feet around fire
  • Extinguish your fire with the “drown, stir and feel” method

This was just posted on fire restrictions:

rtfblog-firerestrictions5-29-20

By Ken Hower

Placer County Crawlers and Slo Town Crawers Deliver Final Rubicon Rock Marker

Memorial Weekend 2020, marked the final chapter in a 10 year project by the Rubicon Trail Foundation to place markers at key locations on the trail.

Over the years, markers have been placed at the Kiosk, Intertie, Little Sluice, Old Sluice, etc.   Most of them were delivered by the Placer County Crawlers.  In May 2013, the majority of the rocks were placed, with the most difficult being Big Sluice rock.

This year, the Slo Town Crawlers and Placer County Crawlers teamed up to deliver the final marker to the Rubicon Springs.  However, this time the rock almost didn’t make it!  Due to a rollover on the Indian Trail descent, the rock spent a portion of the weekend waiting for reinforcements.

But the crew came back later in the weekend, and connected the trail to a new rig, and headed off to Rubicon Springs.

Later in the day, they MADE IT!  The final rock had arrived!

The crew set out to place the rock and was able to take a celebration photo with the rock in place.  Congratulations to so many who worked very hard to place these rocks on the trail.

Never forget…there’s always a ham!  Thanks again to the Placer County Crawlers and Slo Town Crawlers.

By Chris Cowan

Sanitation on the Rubicon Trail

The Rubicon Trail Foundation, in 2010, built a Unimog as a “proof of concept” to solve the issues of sanitation on the trail. Now that the Rubicon Trail Foundation has proved after many toilets cleaned and pumped by a volunteer on our board taking about 10 hours, split between two days each cleaning, El Dorado County Parks & Recreation has decided to take on this task.

Sanitation is always a concern when on the trail. While there are outhouses on the Rubicon Trail, sometimes there are many individuals visiting the trail and they cannot take that much usage. 

There are always people who leave “white flowers” behind that soil our precious land. What is a “white flower”?  It is toilet paper left behind.  The preferred sanitation system on the Rubicon Trail is wag bags. What is a “wag bag”?  It is a safe, eco-friendly human waste disposal system. Each kit is pre-loaded with a gel/deodorizing powder. All you need is a portable toilet like a PETT Toilet or any other portable toilet. You simply follow the instructions that are printed on the bag and it makes a safe, viable way to dispose of human waste safely in any garbage receptacle. Pack it in Pack it Out is the easiest solution to the sanitation problem on the trail. Always dispose of them in a trash bin, NEVER in toilets.

You must be prepared so you should always carry some. Just with any other garbage, human waste, sometimes must be hauled out. Using a wag bag makes it easy to do so.

We are always happy to provide you with some before your next trip, so contact us at: info@rubicontrailfoundation.org or call us at 888-678-2426.

 

 

By Ken Hower

Cadillac Hill Rock Flight Success

In 2018, Vickie Sanders at El Dorado County began laying the seeds with Placer County to assume control over the maintenance of the Rubicon Trail from Loon Lake through to Lake Tahoe. The Rubicon Trail has never been a high priority for Placer County, so El Dorado County began the process to get an MOU (Memorandum of Understand or Formal written agreement) in order to take control.  In 2019, with the MOU secure, Vickie began planning a very important project on Cadillac Hill.  At the very popular Steve Morris history of the Rubicon speech at Jeepers Jamboree, Steve stated that in his opinion, the road base at Cadillac Hill was 10 feet lower in some areas from his first visit.  This erosion over the years lowering sections of the hillside needed to be addressed. However, the amount of natural rock around Cadillac Hill had been used in previous projects.  It was clear that a helicopter would be required to fly rock available at the Gerle Addit, an ENF facility (Loon Lake, spillway, and tunnel rock from the ’50s) to Cadillac Hill.  Vickie secured a grant from the OHV Fund to hire the Sikorsky S-64 Skycrane from Siller, but the grant required matching funds.  In early 2020, the Rubicon Trail Foundation voted to provide the $32,000 of matching funds required to execute the grant.  The project was on!

In April, when the weather on the trail became more clear, Siller was able to confirm availability for the weekend of May 15-17.  However, any project like this requires manpower and Jeepers Jamboree, with years of experience doing work on Cadillac Hill, stepped up to provide the crew required to complete the work.  Rubicon Trail Foundation provided support by feeding the volunteers, in addition to the previously approved matching funds.

On May 15, the rock began being flown to Cadillac.  There were 3 RTF directors, 3 JJ directors, and 5 JJ volunteers for a total of 10 people on site for rock delivery. Rock was laid down on cyclone fence and the fence was pulled over and secured with hog rings.  More rock was placed over that blanket of rock, for final securing.

Final work below V Rock

In total, 264,000 lbs of rock was flown to Cadillac Hill and a couple other locations. Overall the project was a major success and a great example of El Dorado County, State OHV Fund, Rubicon Trail Foundation donors, and trail volunteers to ensure an important project on the trail is completed.

By Chris Cowan

Press Release: Toilet Pumping on the Rubicon

The Rubicon Trail Foundation (RTF) was asked by Vickie Sanders, Parks Manager for El Dorado County if we would be interested in an as needed contract for pumping the restrooms on the Rubicon.

The RTF Board met to discuss the “as needed” contract and our consensus was, we don’t have the manpower this year to operate the Unimog on the trail. It was our understanding the county poo truck would be ready to go this season, so we focused our energies on other trail activities. 

As a possible solution, RTF has offered to train a county employee on the operation of the RTF Unimog.  We have also offered to lease the Unimog to the County for $1 for the season.

The RTF board understands the necessity of pumping and cleaning the toilets on the trail and we are open to any suggestions to make sure it gets done properly and in a timely manner. 

The Rubicon Trail Foundation is federally recognized, non-profit organization dedicated to the future health of the Rubicon Trail.  The Rubicon Trail Foundation acts as the support for Rubicon work projects, Friends of the Rubicon, and as a liaison with local government organizations. This support can range from getting approval for projects from the appropriate agencies, to feeding the volunteers, to buying the supplies needed to maintain the trail. We also fight the efforts of others to close or restrict use of the Rubicon Trail System.  All funds raised help to enhance the future health of the Rubicon Trail, while ensuring responsible motorized year-round access.

Our Officers and Directors represent a wide variety of Rubicon Trail users and supporters.  These include trail users, land owners, county representatives, manufacturers, and Rubicon event organizers.  For more information on getting involved or supporting the Rubicon Trail Foundation please call us at 888-678-2426 or visit our website at www.rubicontrail.org.